This country is in the strangling grip of an opioid epidemic that is fueled by prescription abuse and wide availability. It has reached nearly every location from big cities to tiny towns, and it claims more lives every day whether from overdose or the effects of chronic use on individuals that once had healthy and productive lives.

Opioids are a type of depressant that is made from components of the opium poppy that is grown in some regions of the world. They include legitimate medication such as oxycodone and morphine, as well as illicit formulations like heroin. Opioids are often prescribed to treat or control pain that is generally unable to be managed by other means. They are referred to as narcotic analgesics.

Oxycodone is an opioid that frequently comes in pill form and is prescribed to control high levels of pain that other types of medicine cannot mitigate. It may also be prescribed when dosages of other drugs would need to be high enough that additional symptoms or side effects preclude their use. Just as all opioids, oxycodone has a very significant effect on the central nervous system.

Oxycodone, just like all opioids, should only be taken for short periods due to the tendency to be habit-forming and the incredible chemical dependency that it can create with long-term use. There are significant physical and mental side effects that become prevalent with long-term or habitual use, and in many cases t, the withdrawal side effects will be serious enough that someone seeking to recover from oxycodone addiction should work with treatment professionals.

What is An Oxycodone High?

Because of how it acts on the brain chemistry, oxycodone affects significant changes in how both your brain and your body respond to a pain stimulus. If a medical professional has prescribed oxycodone to someone that is experiencing extreme pain, the drug works with the brain to help block out that pain, and the user does not experience a recreational “high” that the typical abuser would experience. 

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When someone takes oxycodone for an illicit recreational purpose, they will feel a strong sense of euphoria set in shortly after consuming the drug. This feeling along with the depressant effects of the drug will often be active in the user for anywhere from 8 to 12 hours after ingestion. This can last longer depending on what the method is that was used to consume the oxycodone. Those who take the pill as directed may experience standard duration, while those who crush the pill to snort it will experience shorter durations for their effects, and those who convert it to an injectable will see the strongest and longest-lasting effects.

The next group of symptoms that someone would feel are the effects of both muscle weakness and slow movement, this can be very disorienting for many users. Weak movement combined with powerful drowsiness is common, sometimes with the user unable to stay awake during interactions and slurred speech being very noticeable.

Side-Effects of an Oxycodone High

Some of the first side effects that an oxycodone addict, users will begin to notice a reduced or diminished appetite whenever they are using. This appetite reduction effect can last from use to use, sometimes continuing for months at a time. The dosage is important as well since too strong of a dose can make the user nauseous and may even cause vomiting. The user will be experiencing a strong feeling of detachment from the current situation, and may not express any opinion over their behavior. There are also a variety of effects that may result from the administration of the drug as well. 

Snorting

Users often crush the pills up to be able to snort them, which allows the drug to take effect quicker than through the oral route. This significantly raises the chances of a serious sinus infection. The damage to the nasal and sinus tissue from snorting can also lead to necrosis, or tissue death, of the areas in and around the sinus cavity.

Oral Route

By taking the pills as they were initially intended, many people new to opioid abuse face an elevated risk of overdose due to the delay in onset of the drug’s effects versus when it is taken. Since it can take 15-30 minutes to begin feeling the effects of the oxycodone pill, some users may take more before it has had a chance to take effect, leading to a surge of the drug in the user’s system when it dissolves.

Injection

This method of administration carries all of the usual risks of opioid use, as well as the potential illnesses and disorders possible from intravenous drug use. These dangers include the risk of blood borne pathogens like HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, and more. There is also a much larger potential for overdose conditions when drugs are injected since they have a direct route to the heart and brain. 

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Oxycodone High Abuse/Addiction Potential

The risk of abuse or addiction with oxycodone is incredibly high, due to the potential chemical dependence created if use is maintained regularly for a long period. This also carries the potential of extremely severe withdrawal symptoms that the user will begin to experience, in some cases, just hours after their last dose.

This initial reward system, then the routine of using to avoid the withdrawal sickness is what makes oxycodone addiction so very dangerous. The most terrible thing is that addiction can happen even when following the prescription exactly, putting anyone in contact with opioids at risk.

How to Get Help if Addicted to an Oxycodone High

If you or someone you are close to maybe having trouble with opioids like oxycodone, getting help from professionals can be one of the most important steps in a successful recovery. With the potentially severe withdrawal effects from oxycodone, going through the detox process with the help of trained medical professionals can lower the chances of the most dangerous and even painful complications that are possible.

Reaching out for help is the first step to lifelong recovery. Remember, asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness. Reach out to a friendly admissions staff member who can answer any questions you may have and set you on a path to a better tomorrow right now.